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Chemotherapy increases risk of breast cancer patients suffering from metabolic syndrome

Font Size: [Big][Mid][Small] 2016-9-27    Views: 382    

A study strongly suggests that women no matter before or after surgery for early breast cancer 12 to 18 weeks of chemo treatment, the risk of metabolic syndrome will rise. The study was published in September 1, 2016 in Cancer, titled " An observational study to examine changes in metabolic syndrome components in patients with breast cancer receiving neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy."

BACKGROUND:

The authors sought to determine the effect of chemotherapy on the development of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in premenopausal and postmenopausal women undergoing (neo)adjuvant therapy for early-stage breast cancer.

METHODS:

A total of 86 women with early-stage (AJCC stage I-III) breast cancer who were free from clinically diagnosed MetS (defined as 3 of 5 components of MetS) were prospectively tested for the presence of the 5 components of MetS within 1 week before initiating and after completing (neo)adjuvant chemotherapy. The 5 components of MetS measured were waist circumference; blood pressure; and fasting levels of blood glucose, triglycerides, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Anthropometrics (body weight, percentage body fat, fat mass), lipid profile (total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol), glucose metabolism (insulin, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance, glycated hemoglobin), and inflammation (C-reactive protein) also were examined before initiating and after completing treatment.

RESULTS:

The current study included 46 premenopausal and 40 postmenopausal women. All individual MetS components and the overall MetS score were found to be statistically significantly increased (P<.01) after chemotherapy. Body weight, percentage body fat, fat mass, lipids, glucose metabolism, and inflammation also were found to be statistically significantly increased (P<.01).

CONCLUSIONS:

A 12-week to 18-week course of chemotherapy appears to statistically significantly increase MetS and related anthropometrics, biomarkers of glucose metabolism, and inflammation in patients with early-stage breast cancer with no preexisting MetS. Lifestyle interventions such as diet and exercise may be preventive approaches for use during chemotherapy to reduce the onset of MetS in patients with breast cancer.

REFERENCE:

Dieli-Conwright CM, Wong L, Cancer, 2016 Sep 1; 122(17): 2646-53. An observational study to examine changes in metabolic syndrome components in patients with breast cancer receiving neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy.




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